Today’s Weather For FRIDAY! Oct. 6th, 2017

A nice sunny seasonal fall day today low winds and a high of 15C. Currently we have clear sky’s, with a temperature of 8C, our winds are from the S at 8 km/h and increasing to 12 km/h by the afternoon.

We currently have no FIRE DANGER at this time and no other weather or marine warnings for our area.

HAVE A GREAT WEEKEND AND WEEKEND!

Global Aurora at Mars
Image Credit: MAVEN, LASP, University of Colorado, NASA
Explanation: A strong solar event last month triggered intense global aurora at Mars. Before (left) and during (right) the solar storm, these projections show the sudden increase in ultraviolet emission from martian aurora, more than 25 times brighter than auroral emission previously detected by the orbiting MAVEN spacecraft. With a sunlit crescent toward the right, data from MAVEN’s ultraviolet imaging spectrograph is projected in purple hues on the night side of Mars globes simulated to match the observation dates and times. On Mars, solar storms can result in planet-wide aurora because, unlike Earth, the Red Planet isn’t protected by a strong global magnetic field that can funnel energetic charged particles toward the poles. For all those on the planet’s surface during the solar storm, dangerous radiation levels were double any previously measured by the Curiosity rover. MAVEN is studying whether Mars lost its atmosphere due to its lack of a global magnetic field.

Tomorrow’s picture: Eclipsosaurus Rex

Today’s Weather For Thursday Oct. 5th, 2017

WORLD TEACHER DAY TODAY! Clear, sunny low winds and a high of 12C for today. Currently we have clear sky’s, a temperature of 7C, our winds are from the WNW at 2 km/h and will increase to 10 km/h by the afternoon.

We have no FIRE DANGER at this time and there are no weather or marine wind warnings for our area

HAVE A GREAT THURSDAY!

Pluto’s Bladed Terrain
Image Credit: NASA, Johns Hopkins Univ./APL, Southwest Research Institute
Explanation: Imaged during the New Horizons spacecraft flyby in July 2015, Pluto’s bladed terrain is captured in this close-up of the distant world. The bizarre texture belongs to fields of skyscraper-sized, jagged landforms made almost entirely of methane ice, found at extreme altitudes near Pluto’s equator. Casting dramatic shadows, the tall, knife-like ridges seem to have been formed by sublimation. By that process, condensed methane ice turns directly to methane gas without passing through a liquid phase during Pluto’s warmer geological periods. On planet Earth, sublimation can also produce standing fields of knife-like ice sheets, found along the high plateau of the Andes mountain range. Known as penitentes, those bladed structures are made of water ice and at most a few meters tall.

Tomorrow’s picture: pixels in space
 

Today’s Weather For Wednesday Oct. 4th, 2017

Mostly sunny this morning, then some increasing cloud this afternoon/evening with moderate winds and a high of 10C. Currently we have some clouds, with a temperature of 6C, our winds are from the SSW at 13 km/h and will increase to 20 km/h.

We currently have NO FIRE DANGER. There is a MARINE WIND WARNING for the LAKE today/tonight and there are no other weather warnings for our area at this time.

HAVE A GREAT WEDNESDAY!

Winds

Issued 03:00 AM CDT 04 October 2017

Today Tonight and Thursday. Strong wind warning in effect. Wind west 15 knots increasing to west 20 early this morning then veering to northwest 15 to 20 late this afternoon. Wind diminishing to northwest 10 Thursday morning.

The Soul Nebula in Infrared from Herschel
Image Credit & License: ESA, Herschel Space Obs., NASA, JPL-Caltech
Explanation: Stars are forming in the Soul of the Queen of Aethopia. More specifically, a large star forming region called the Soul Nebula can be found in the direction of the constellation Cassiopeia, who Greek mythology credits as the vain wife of a King who long ago ruled lands surrounding the upper Nile river. The Soul Nebula houses several open clusters of stars, a large radio source known as W5, and huge evacuated bubbles formed by the winds of young massive stars. Located about 6,500 light years away, the Soul Nebula spans about 100 light years and is usually imaged next to its celestial neighbor the Heart Nebula (IC 1805). The featured image, impressively detailed, was taken last month in several bands of infrared light by the orbiting Herschel Space Observatory.

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Tomorrow’s picture: plutonian penitentes

Today’s Weather For Tuesday Oct. 3rd, 2017

Another cool gloomy day for us. A chance of showers throughout the day then some clearing by late evening with moderate to high winds and a high of only 8C. Currently we have clouds, some isolated light showers, a temperature of 5C, our winds are from the NNE at 13 km/h and will increase to 18 km/h by the afternoon.

We currently have NO FIRE DANGER. There is MARINE WIND WARNING for the LAKE today again and there is no other weather warnings for our area at this time.

HAVE A GREAT TUESDAY!

Winds

Issued 03:00 AM CDT 03 October 2017

Today Tonight and Wednesday. Strong wind warning in effect. Wind southwest 15 knots except northeast 20 over northern sections. Wind becoming northeast 20 early this morning then diminishing to northeast 15 late this afternoon. Wind becoming west 15 overnight then increasing to west 20 Wednesday morning. Wind diminishing to west 15 Wednesday afternoon.

Ice Ring around Nearby Star Fomalhaut
Image Credit: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO), M. MacGregor; NASA/ESA Hubble, P. Kalas; B. Saxton (NRAO/AUI/NSF)
Explanation: Why is there a large ice ring around Fomalhaut? This interesting star — easily visible in the night sky — lies only about 25 light-years away and is known to be orbited by at least one planet, Dagon, as well as several inner dust disks. More intriguing, perhaps, is an outer ring, first discovered about 20 years ago, that has an unusually sharp inner boundary. The featured recent image by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) shows this outer ring with complete and unprecedented detail — in pink — superposed on a Hubble image of the Fomalhaut system in blue. A leading theory holds that this ring resulted from numerous violent collisions involving icy comets and planetesimals, the component objects of planets, while the ring boundaries are caused by the gravity of yet unseen planets. If correct, any interior planets in the Fomalhaut system are likely being continually pelted by large meteors and comets — an onslaught last seen in our own planetary system four billion years ago in an episode called the Late Heavy Bombardment.

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Tomorrow’s picture: soul sky

Today’s Weather For Monday Oct. 2nd, 2017

Chance of showers this morning then showers will become heavier by this afternoon then lessons in the evening, with moderate to high winds and a high of 14C. Currently we have cloudy skies, a temperature of 13C and our winds are from the SE at 5 km/h and will increase to 15 km/h by the afternoon.

Our FIRE DANGER remains at LOW and we do have MARINE WIND WARNING for the LAKE today with no other weather warnings for our area at this time.

HAVE A GREAT MONDAY!

Winds

Issued 06:36 AM CDT 02 October 2017

Today Tonight and Tuesday. Strong wind warning in effect. Wind east 10 knots becoming light early this afternoon then increasing to north 20 after midnight. Wind diminishing to northeast 15 Tuesday afternoon.

Two Comets and a Star Cluster
Image Credit & Copyright: Damian Peach
Explanation: Two unusual spots are on the move near the famous Pleiades star cluster. Shifting only a small amount per night, these spots are actually comets in our nearby Solar System that by chance wandered into the field of the light-years distant stars. On the far left is comet C/2017 O1 ASAS-SN, a multi-kilometer block of evaporating ice sporting a bright coma of surrounding gas dominated by green-glowing carbon. Comet ASAS-SN1 shows a slight tail to its lower right. Near the frame center is comet C/2015 ER61 PanSTARRS, also a giant block of evaporating ice, but sporting a rather long tail to its right. On the upper right is the Pleiades, an open cluster dominated by bright blue stars illuminating nearby reflecting dust. This exposure, taken about two weeks ago, is so deep that the filamentary interstellar dust can be traced across the entire field. The Pleiades is visible to the unaided eye, but it should require binoculars to see the comets.

Tomorrow’s picture: star ring

Today’s Weather For FRIDAY!! Sept. 29th, 2017

Clear and sunny with moderate to high winds and highs in the low teens for today and tomorrow, we may see some showers on Sunday afternoon. Currently we have clear sky’s, a temperature of only 5C but will increase to 16C by the afternoon, our winds are from the  SSE at 6 km/h and will increase to 20 km/h by the afternoon.

Our FIRE DANGER continue sits at low and the fire season is almost over. We have a MARINE WIND WARNING for the LAKE today and tomorrow. There are no weather warnings for our area at this time.

HAVE A GREAT FRIDAY AND WEEKEND!

Puppis A Supernova Remnant
Image Credit & Copyright: Don Goldman
Explanation: Driven by the explosion of a massive star, supernova remnant Puppis A is blasting into the surrounding interstellar medium about 7,000 light-years away. At that distance, this colorful telescopic field based on broadband and narrowband optical image data is about 60 light-years across. As the supernova remnant (upper right) expands into its clumpy, non-uniform surroundings, shocked filaments of oxygen atoms glow in green-blue hues. Hydrogen and nitrogen are in red. Light from the initial supernova itself, triggered by the collapse of the massive star’s core, would have reached Earth about 3,700 years ago. The Puppis A remnant is actually seen through outlying emission from the closer but more ancient Vela supernova remnant, near the crowded plane of our Milky Way galaxy. Still glowing across the electromagnetic spectrum Puppis A remains one of the brightest sources in the X-ray sky.

Today’s Weather For Thursday Sept. 28th, 2017

A mix of sun and cloud this morning/afternoon then turning mostly cloudy in the evening/overnight with low to moderate winds and high of 14C. Currently we have a few clouds, temperature of 9C, our winds are from the NW at 2 km/h and increasing to 15 km/h by the afternoon.

Our FIRE DANGER continues to sit at LOW but increasing. We currently have no weather or marine wind warnings for our area at this time.

HAVE A GREAT THURSDAY!

LIGO-Virgo GW170814 Skymap
Illustration Credit: LIGOVirgo Collaboration – Optical Sky Data: A. Mellinger
Explanation: From around planet Earth three gravitational wave detectors have now reported a joint detection of ripples in spacetime, the fourth announced detection of a binary black hole merger in the distant Universe. The event was recorded on 2017 August 14, and so christened GW170814, by the LIGO observatory sites in Hanford, Washington and Livingston, Louisiana, and the more recently operational Virgo Observatory near Pisa, Italy. The signal was emitted in the final moments of the coalescence of two black holes of 31 and 25 solar masses located about 1.8 billion light-years away. But comparing the timing of the gravitational wave detections at all three sites allowed astronomers to vastly improve the location of the signal’s origin on the sky. Just above the Magellanic clouds and generally toward the constellation Eridanus, the only sky region consistent with signals in all three detectors is indicated by the yellow contour line in this all-sky map. The all-sky projection includes the arc of our Milky Way Galaxy. An improved three-detector location of the gravitational wave source allowed rapid follow-up observations by other, more conventional, electromagnetic wave observatories that can search for potentially related signals. The addition of the Virgo detector also allowed the gravitational wave polarization to be measured, a property that further confirms predictions of Einstein’s general relativity.

Tomorrow’s picture: supernova remnant

Today’s Weather For Wednesday Sept. 27th, 2017

Mainly sunny with moderate winds and a high of 16C for today. Currently we have a few clouds, a temperature of 11C, our winds are from the W at 3 km/h and will increase to 15 km/h throughout the day.

Our FIRE DANGER continues to sit at LOW and we have no weather or marine warnings for our area at this time.

HAVE A GREAT WEDNESDAY!

Layers of a Total Solar Eclipse
Image Credit: Inside: Solar Dynamics Observatory, LMSAL and NASA’s GSFC;
Middle: Jay Pasachoff, Ron Dantowitz, and the Williams College Solar Eclipse Expedition/NSF/National Geographic;
Outside: LASCO from NRL on SOHO from ESA
Explanation: Neither rain, nor snow, nor dark of night can keep a space-based spacecraft from watching the Sun. In fact, from its vantage point 1.5 million kilometers sunward of planet Earth, NASA’s SOlar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) can always monitor the Sun’s outer atmosphere, or corona. But only during a total solar eclipse can Earth-based observers also see the lovely coronal streamers and structures – when the Moon briefly blocks the overwhelmingly bright solar surface. Then, it becomes possible to follow detailed coronal activity all the way down to the Sun’s surface. In the outside layer of this composite image, SOHO’s uninterrupted view of the solar corona during last month’s eclipse is shown in orange hues. The middle, donut-shaped region is the corona as recorded by the Williams College Eclipse Expedition to Salem, Oregon. Simultaneously, the inner view is from NASA’s Earth-orbiting Solar Dynamics Observatory, which, being outside of totality, was able to image the face of the Sun in extreme ultraviolet light, shown in gold.

Tomorrow’s picture: open space

Today’s Weather For Tuesday Sept. 26th, 2017

Clear with lots of sun, a little warmer with low to moderate winds for today. Currently we have clear sky’s, a temperature of 7C and our winds are from the SSE at 10 km/h but will increase 15 km/h by the afternoon.

Our FIRE DANGER sits at LOW and we have no weather or marine wind warnings for our area at this time.

HAVE A GREAT TUESDAY!

Cassini’s Last Ring Portrait at Saturn
Image Credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech, Space Science Institute, Mindaugas Macijauskas
Explanation: How should Cassini say farewell to Saturn? Three days before plunging into Saturn‘s sunny side, the robotic Cassini spacecraft swooped far behind Saturn’s night side with cameras blazing. Thirty-six of these images have been merged — by an alert and adept citizen scientist — into a last full-ring portrait of Cassini’s home planet for the past 13 years. The Sun is just above the frame, causing Saturn to cast a dark shadow onto its enormous rings. This shadow position cannot be imaged from Earth and will not be visible again until another Earth-launched spaceship visits the ringed giant. Data and images from Cassini’s mission-ending dive into Saturn’s atmosphere on September 15 continue to be analyzed.

Almost Hyperspace: Random APOD Generator
Tomorrow’s picture: coronal matchup

Today’s Weather For Monday Sept. 25th, 2017

Chilly this morning! A mix of sun and cloud, with low winds and a high of 12C for today. Currently we have a temperature of only 3C, our winds are calm but will increase to 10 km/h by the afternoon.

Our FIRE DANGER is VERY LOW and we have no weather or marine wind warnings for our area at this time.

HAVE A GREAT MONDAY!

Massive Shell-Expelling Star G79.29+0.46
Image Credit: NASA, Spitzer Space Telescope, WISE; Processing & License : Judy Schmidt
Explanation: Stars this volatile are quite rare. Captured in the midst of dust clouds and visible to the right and above center is massive G79.29+0.46, one of less than 100 luminous blue variable stars (LBVs) currently known in our Galaxy. LBVs expel shells of gas and may lose even the mass of Jupiter over 100 years. The star, itself bright and blue, is shrouded in dust and so not seen in visible light. The dying star appears green and surrounded by red shells, though, in this mapped-color infrared picture combining images from NASA’s Spitzer Space Observatory and NASA’s Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer. G79.29+0.46 is located in the star-forming Cygnus X region of our Galaxy. Why G79.29+0.46 is so volatile, how long it will remain in the LBV phase, and when it will explode in a supernova is not known.

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Tomorrow’s picture: a farewell to saturn