Today’s Weather For Thursday Nov. 16th, 2017

It will be turning ugly by this afternoon with high winds and heavy snow at times. There is a SNOWFALL WARNING for our area for this afternoon/evening with total accumulations of 10-15CM, but I perdict more like 5-10CM. Currently we have increasing cloud, a chilly temperature of -13C fells like -18C with our windchill, our winds are from the SSE at 10 km/h with wind gusts up to 25 km/h throughout the day/evening then the winds should decrease by overnight.

There is a WEATHER WARNING and a MARINE WIND WARNING ISSUED for our area. PLEASE SEE BELOW.

HAVE A GREAT THURSDAY!

Warnings

4:48 AM CST Thursday 16 November 2017
Snowfall warning in effect for:

  • Grand Rapids and Easterville
  • Waterhen Meadow Portage and Skownan

Snowfall, with total amounts of 10 to 15 cm is expected.

Snow, at times heavy, starting this afternoon and persisting through night.

A low pressure system will develop in southern Alberta this morning and track northeastward across Saskatchewan throughout the day. Snow associated with this system will move into central and northern Manitoba beginning early this afternoon and will continue throughout the night. Total snowfall accumulations of 10 to 15 cm are expected before the snow tapers off Friday morning and the system departs the area.

Prepare for quickly changing and deteriorating travel conditions. Visibility may be suddenly reduced at times in heavy snow.

Snowfall warnings are issued when significant snowfall is expected.

Please continue to monitor alerts and forecasts issued by Environment Canada. To report severe weather, send an email to ec.storm.ec@canada.ca or tweet reports using #MBStorm.

Winds

Issued 03:00 AM CST 16 November 2017

Today Tonight and Friday. Strong wind warning in effect. Wind southeast 15 knots increasing to southeast 20 to 25 early this morning and to southeast 30 this afternoon. Wind diminishing to south 15 near midnight then increasing to northwest 20 overnight. Wind diminishing to northwest 15 Friday morning.

The Tarantula Nebula
Image Credit & Copyright: Ignacio Diaz Bobillo
Explanation: The Tarantula Nebula is more than a thousand light-years in diameter, a giant star forming region within nearby satellite galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud, about 180 thousand light-years away. The largest, most violent star forming region known in the whole Local Group of galaxies, the cosmic arachnid sprawls across this spectacular view composed with narrowband data centered on emission from ionized hydrogen and oxygen atoms. Within the Tarantula (NGC 2070), intense radiation, stellar winds and supernova shocks from the central young cluster of massive stars, cataloged as R136, energize the nebular glow and shape the spidery filaments. Around the Tarantula are other star forming regions with young star clusters, filaments, and blown-out bubble-shaped clouds. In fact, the frame includes the site of the closest supernova in modern times, SN 1987A, right of center. The rich field of view spans about 1 degree or 2 full moons, in the southern constellation Dorado. But were the Tarantula Nebula closer, say 1,500 light-years distant like the local star forming Orion Nebula, it would take up half the sky.

Watch: Leonid Meteor Shower
Tomorrow’s picture: November Night

Today’s Weather For Wednesday Nov. 15, 2017

A cold day with a mix of sun and cloud, moderate to high winds and a high of -10C. Currently we have a few clouds, a temperature of -16C feels like -21C with our windchill, our winds are from the NE at 8 km/h increasing to 20 km/h by late this morning.

There is a MARINE WIND WARNING for the LAKE today and no other weather warnings for our area at this time.

HAVE A GREAT WEDNESDAY!

Winds

Issued 03:00 AM CST 15 November 2017

Today Tonight and Thursday. Strong wind warning in effect. Wind north 20 knots diminishing to north 10 to 15 this morning then becoming east 10 early this evening. Wind increasing to southeast 20 to 25 Thursday morning.
NGC 7789: Caroline’s Rose
Image Credit & Copyright: Guillaume Seigneure
Explanation: Found among the rich starfields of the Milky Way, star cluster NGC 7789 lies about 8,000 light-years away toward the constellation Cassiopeia. A late 18th century deep sky discovery of astronomer Caroline Lucretia Herschel, the cluster is also known as Caroline’s Rose. Its flowery visual appearance in small telescopes is created by the cluster’s nestled complex of stars and voids. Now estimated to be 1.6 billion years young, the galactic or open cluster of stars also shows its age. All the stars in the cluster were likely born at the same time, but the brighter and more massive ones have more rapidly exhausted the hydrogen fuel in their cores. These have evolved from main sequence stars like the Sun into the many red giant stars shown with a yellowish cast in this lovely color composite. Using measured color and brightness, astronomers can model the mass and hence the age of the cluster stars just starting to “turn off” the main sequence and become red giants. Over 50 light-years across, Caroline’s Rose spans about half a degree (the angular size of the Moon) near the center of the wide-field telescopic image.

Tomorrow’s picture: pixels in space
 

Today’s Weather For Tuesday Nov. 14th, 2017

Cloudy with scattered flurries throughout the day into this evening and overnight hours with calm to low winds and a high of -2C. Currently we have overcast sky’s, a temperature of -4C feels like -8C with our light windchill, our winds are from the NE at 10 km/h and will remain steady through the day into this evening.

There are no weather or marine wind warnings for our area at this time.

HAVE A GREAT TUESDAY!

The Pleiades Deep and Dusty
Image Credit & Copyright: Juan Carlos Casado (TWAN, Earth & Stars), Miquel Serra-Ricart & Daniel Padron, FECYT
Explanation: The well-known Pleiades star cluster is slowly destroying part of a passing cloud of gas and dust. The Pleiades is the brightest open cluster of stars on Earth’s sky and can be seen from almost any northerly location with the unaided eye. The passing young dust cloud is thought to be part of Gould’s Belt, an unusual ring of young star formation surrounding the Sun in the local Milky Way Galaxy. Over the past 100,000 years, part of Gould’s Belt is by chance moving right through the older Pleiades and is causing a strong reaction between stars and dust. Pressure from the stars’ light significantly repels the dust in the surrounding blue reflection nebula, with smaller dust particles being repelled more strongly. A short-term result is that parts of the dust cloud have become filamentary and stratified. The featured deep image also captured Comet C/2015 ER61 (PanSTARRS) on the lower left.

Tomorrow’s picture: open space

Today’s Weather For Nov. 13th, 2017

Party sunny day with low to moderate winds and a high of 0C today. Currently we have some cloud, a temperature of -9C feels like -15C with our windchill, our winds are from the ESE at 13 km/h and will increase to 20 throughout the day.

There is a MARINE WIND WARNING for the LAKE today and there are no other weather warnings for our area at this time.

HAVE A GREAT MONDAY!

Winds

Issued 03:00 AM CST 13 November 2017

Today Tonight and Tuesday. Strong wind warning in effect. Wind southeast 10 knots veering to southwest 10 Tuesday morning then becoming light near noon Tuesday. Wind increasing to north 25 Tuesday evening.

Comet Machholz Approaches the Sun
Image Credit: NASA, SOHO, LASCO, Barbara Thompson (NASA’s GSFC)
Explanation: Why is Comet Maccholz so depleted of carbon-containing chemicals? Comet 96P/Machholz‘s original fame derives from its getting closer to the Sun than any other short period comet — half as close as Mercury — and doing so every five years. To better understand this unusual comet, NASA’s Sun-monitoring SOHO spacecraft tracked the comet during its latest approach to the Sun in October. The featured image composite shows the tail-enhanced comet swooping past the Sun. The Sun’s bright surface is hidden from view behind a dark occulter, although parts of the Sun’s extended corona are visible. Neighboring stars dot the background. One hypothesis holds that these close solar approaches somehow cause Comet Machholz to shed its carbon, while another hypothesis posits that the comet formed with this composition far away — possibly even in another star system.

Free APOD Lectures: January 5 in NYC & January 9 in DC
Tomorrow’s picture: dust cluster

Today’s Weather For Thursday Nov. 9th, 2017

A chilly day ahead, moderate to high winds, a chance of flurries throughout the morning and afternoon with a high of -9C and a overnight low of -12C. Currently we have some cloud cover, a chilly temperature of -13C feels like -14C with our light windchill and our winds are light from the N at 2 km/h and will increase to 20 km/h throughout the day.

There is a MARINE WIND WARNING for the LAKE today and no other weather warnings for our area at this at.

HAVE A GREAT THURSDAY!

Winds

Issued 03:00 AM CST 09 November 2017

Today Tonight and Friday. Strong wind warning in effect. Wind northwest 20 to 25 knots diminishing to northwest 10 to 15 near noon and to light early this evening. Wind increasing to south 15 to 20 late this evening and to south 25 Friday morning. Wind diminishing to south 15 Friday evening.
NGC 1055 Close-up
Image Credit & Copyright: Processing – Robert Gendler, Roberto Colombari
Data – European Southern Observatory, Subaru Telescope (NAOJ), et al.
Explanation: Big, beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 1055 is a dominant member of a small galaxy group a mere 60 million light-years away toward the aquatically intimidating constellation Cetus. Seen edge-on, the island universe spans over 100,000 light-years, a little larger than our own Milky Way. The colorful stars in this cosmic close-up of NGC 1055 are in the foreground, well within the Milky Way. But the telltale pinkish star forming regions are scattered through winding dust lanes along the distant galaxy’s thin disk. With a smattering of even more distant background galaxies, the deep image also reveals a boxy halo that extends far above and below the central bluge and disk of NGC 1055. The halo itself is laced with faint, narrow structures, and could represent the mixed and spread out debris from a satellite galaxy disrupted by the larger spiral some 10 billion years ago.

Tomorrow’s picture: pixels in space

Today’s Weather For Wednesday Nov. 8th, 2017

Another cold, breezy day with a chance of flurries, moderate to high winds and a high of -10C. Currently we have mostly cloudy sky’s, a chilly temperature of -14C feels like -18C, our winds are from the N at 6 km/h and will increase to 20 km/h throughout the day.

There is a MARINE WIND WARNING for the LAKE today and there are no other weather warnings for our area at this time.

HAVE A GREAT WEDNESDAY!

Today’s Weather For Tuesday Nov. 7th, 2017

Cloudy with scattered flurries for today, this evening and overnight with moderate to high winds and a high of -7C. Currently we have increasing cloud, a temperature of -8C feels like -13C, our winds are from the SSW at 13 km/h and will increase to 25 km/h throughout the day.

There is a MARINE WIND WARNING and no other weather warnings for our area at this time.

HAVE A GREAT TUESDAY!

Winds

Issued 03:00 AM CST 07 November 2017

Today Tonight and Wednesday. Strong wind warning in effect. Wind southwest 20 knots veering to northwest 25 early this evening then diminishing to west 15 Wednesday afternoon.

The Prague Astronomical Clock
Image Credit & License: Jorge Láscar
Explanation: In the center of Prague there’s a clock the size of a building. During the day, crowds gather to watch the show when it chimes in a new hour. The Prague Astronomical Clock‘s face is impressively complex, giving not only the expected time with respect to the Sun (solar time), but the time relative to the stars (sidereal time), the times of sunrise and sunset, the time at the equator, the phase of the Moon, and much more. The clock began operation in 1410, and even though much of its inner workings have been modernized several times, original parts remain. Below the clock is a nearly-equal sized, but static, solar calendar. Pictured, the Prague Astronomical Clock was photographed alone during an early morning in 2009 March. The Prague Astronomical Clock and the Old Town Tower behind it are currently being renovated once again, with the clock expected to be restarted in 2018 June.

Tomorrow’s picture: a changing nebula