Today’s Weather, Highway Conditions and Images For Tuesday March 24th, 2020

Snow today. Rain over southern sections this afternoon. Risk of freezing rain early this morning. Snowfall amount 5 to 10 cm. Wind becoming northeast 20 km/h gusting to 40 this morning. High +1. Wind chill -9 this morning. Snow ending late this evening then partly cloudy. Wind north 20 km/h gusting to 40 becoming light early this evening. Low -14. Wind chill -9 this evening and -16 overnight. Currently we have snow a temperature of -5 feels like -11, our winds are 13 km/h from the N.

Currently WE DO HAVE A SNOWFALL WARNING AND A MARINE SNOWFALL WARNING FOR THE LAKE TODAY. PLEASE SEE BELOW

Our highways in and around our area are COVERED/SLIPPERY AND TRAVEL IS NOT RECOMMENDED TODAY INTO TONIGHT CONDITIONS IMPROVE DRAMATICALLY AS YOU TRAVEL (IF YOU MUST) SOUTH.

HAVE A GREAT TUESDAY!

Current Weather Warnings and Marine Weather/Wind Warning

Warnings

4:29 AM CDT Tuesday 24 March 2020
Snowfall warning in effect for:

  • Grand Rapids and Easterville
  • Waterhen Meadow Portage and Skownan

A low pressure system from Alberta will bring a variety of precipitation to the area today.

Areas in the southern parts of these regions, this includes Swan River and Waterhen, may see a mixture of precipitation this morning with patchy rain or freezing rain changing to wet snow this morning. Snowfall amounts in the 2 to 5 cm range are expected by late this afternoon.

However, to the north, this includes the Porcupine Hills, Pelican Rapids, Grand Rapids and Poplar River, heavy snow with total accumulations of 10 to 20 cm is expected. The precipitation is expected to end this evening as the system moves into northwestern Ontario.

Prepare for quickly changing and deteriorating travel conditions. Visibility may be suddenly reduced at times in heavy snow.

Please continue to monitor alerts and forecasts issued by Environment Canada. To report severe weather, send an email to MBstorm@canada.ca or tweet reports using #MBStorm.

Warnings

4:29 AM CDT Tuesday 24 March 2020
Snowfall warning in effect for:

  • Grand Rapids and Easterville
  • Waterhen Meadow Portage and Skownan

A low pressure system from Alberta will bring a variety of precipitation to the area today.

Areas in the southern parts of these regions, this includes Swan River and Waterhen, may see a mixture of precipitation this morning with patchy rain or freezing rain changing to wet snow this morning. Snowfall amounts in the 2 to 5 cm range are expected by late this afternoon.

However, to the north, this includes the Porcupine Hills, Pelican Rapids, Grand Rapids and Poplar River, heavy snow with total accumulations of 10 to 20 cm is expected. The precipitation is expected to end this evening as the system moves into northwestern Ontario.

Prepare for quickly changing and deteriorating travel conditions. Visibility may be suddenly reduced at times in heavy snow.

Please continue to monitor alerts and forecasts issued by Environment Canada. To report severe weather, send an email to MBstorm@canada.ca or tweet reports using #MBStorm.

Current Highway Conditions and Images

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download
the highest resolution version available.

2020 March 24
A Black Hole Disrupts a Passing Star
Illustration Credit: NASAJPL-Caltech

Explanation: What happens to a star that goes near a black hole? If the star directly impacts a massive black hole, then the star falls in completely — and everything vanishes. More likely, though, the star goes close enough to have the black hole’s gravity pull away the outer layers of the star, or disrupt the star. Then most of the star’s gas does not fall into the black hole. These stellar tidal disruption events can be as bright as a supernova, and an increasing amount of them are being discovered by automated sky surveys. In the featured artist’s illustration, a star has just passed a massive black hole and sheds gas that continues to orbit. The inner edge of a disk of gas and dust surrounding the black hole is heated by the disruption event and may glow long after the star is gone.Tomorrow’s picture: star wings