Today’s Weather, Highway Conditions and Images For Wednesday February 5th, 2020

Mainly cloudy with 60% chance of light snow. Wind up to 15 km/h. High -10 with temperature falling to -17 this afternoon. Wind chill -14 this morning and -24 this afternoon. Mainly cloudy with 60% chance of light snow this evening and after midnight. Clearing before morning. Wind up to 15 km/h. Low -26. Wind chill -24 this evening and -32 overnight. Risk of frostbite. Currently we have some clouds a temperature of -12 feels like -17, our winds are 8 km/h from the NNW.

Currently we NO weather warnings and NO marine weather/wind warnings for our area.

Our highways in and around our area are in EXCELLENT WINTER DRIVING CONDITIONS WITH SLIPPERY AREAS IN HIGHWAY JUNCTIONS, PLEASE TAKE CAUTION ENTERING THESE AREAS.

HAVE A GREAT WEDNESDAY!

Current Weather Warnings and Marine Weather/Wind Warnings

Current Highway Conditions and Images

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

Lunar Eclipse Perspectives
Image Credit: F. PichardoG. HoganP. HorálekF. HemmerichS. SchraeblerL. HašplR. Eder;
Processing & Copyright Matipon TangmatithamTextMatipon Tangmatitham (NARIT)

Explanation: Do we all see the same Moon? Yes, but we all see it differently. One difference is the apparent location of the Moon against background stars — an effect known as parallax. We humans use the parallax between our eyes to judge depth. To see lunar parallax, though, we need eyes placed at a much greater separations — hundreds to thousands of kilometers apart. Another difference is that observers around the Earth all see a slightly different face of our spherical Moon — an effect known as libration. The featured image is a composite of many views across the Earth, as submitted to APOD, of the total lunar eclipse of 2019 January 21. These images are projected against the same background stars to illustrate both effects. The accurate superposition of these images was made possible by a serendipitous meteorite impact on the Moon during the lunar eclipse, labeled here L1-21J — guaranteeing that these submitted images were all taken within a split second.Tomorrow’s picture: open space