Today’s Weather And Current Fire Conditions For Thursday August 6th, 2018

A mix of sun and cloud today with moderate winds and a high of 14C. Currently we have a few clouds, a temperature of 9C, our winds are from the NW 3 km/h increasing to 15 km/h throughout the day.

There are no weather or marine warnings for our area at this time.

Our FIRE DANGER continues to sit at MODERATE: Moderate (Blue) – Some wildfires may be expected. Expect moderate flame length and rate of spread. Control is usually not difficult and light to moderate mop-up can be expected. Although controlled burning can be done without creating a hazard, routine caution should be taken.

HAVE A GREAT THURSDAY!

WEATHER WARNINGS AND MARINE WIND WARNINGS

CURRENT FIRE CONDITIONS

CURRENT HIGHWAY OBSERVATIONS

NASA ASTRONOMY PICTURE OF THE DAY

Along the Western Veil 
Image Credit & Copyright: Data – Steve Milne & Barry Wilson, Processing – Steve Milne
Explanation: Delicate in appearance, these filaments of shocked, glowing gas, are draped across planet Earth’s sky toward the constellation of Cygnus. They form the western part of the Veil Nebula. The Veil Nebula itself is a largesupernova remnant, an expanding cloud born of the death explosion of a massive star. Light from the original supernova explosion likely reached Earth over 5,000 years ago. Blasted out in the cataclysmic event, the interstellar shock wave plows through space sweeping up and exciting interstellar material. The glowing filaments are really more like long ripples in a sheet seen almost edge on, remarkably well separated into atomic hydrogen (red) and oxygen (blue-green) gas. Also known as the Cygnus Loop, the Veil Nebula now spans nearly 3 degrees or about 6 times the diameter of the full Moon. While that translates to over 70 light-years at its estimated distance of 1,500 light-years, this telescopic two panel mosaic image of the western portion spans about half that distance. Brighter parts of the western Veil are recognized as separate nebulae, including The Witch’s Broom (NGC 6960) along the top of this view and Pickering’s Triangle(NGC 6979) below and left.

Tomorrow’s picture: northern Saturn

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