Today’s Weather And Current Fire Conditions For Monday June 4th, 2018

Mix of sun and cloud today then showers overnight into Tuesday low to moderate winds and a high of 17C. Currently we some cloud, a temperature of 6C, our winds are calm but will increase to 15 km/h throughout the day.

We have no weather warnings but there is a MARINE WIND WARNING IN EFFECT: Issued 03:00 AM CDT 04 June 2018 – Today Tonight and Tuesday.Strong wind warning in effect.Wind north 10 knots becoming light late this morning then increasing to east 15 late this evening. Wind increasing to south 20 Tuesday morning then diminishing to west 10 Tuesday evening.

Our FIRE DANGER continues to sit at LOW – Low (Green) – Fire starts are unlikely. Weather and fuel conditions will lead to slow fire spread, low intensity and relatively easy control with light mop-up. Controlled burns can usually be executed with reasonable safety.

HAVE A GREAT MONDAY!

   

Winds

Issued 03:00 AM CDT 04 June 2018

Today Tonight and Tuesday.Strong wind warning in effect.Wind north 10 knots becoming light late this morning then increasing to east 15 late this evening. Wind increasing to south 20 Tuesday morning then diminishing to west 10 Tuesday evening.

CURRENT FIRE CONDITIONS

CURRENT HIGHWAY OBSERVATIONS 

Saturn’s Iapetus: Painted Moon 
Image Credit: NASAESAJPLSSICassini Imaging Team
Explanation: What has happened to Saturn’s moon Iapetus? Vast sections of this strange world are dark as coal, while others are as bright as ice. The composition of the dark material is unknown, but infrared spectra indicate that it possibly contains some dark form of carbon. Iapetus also has an unusual equatorial ridge that makes it appear like a walnut. To help better understand this seemingly painted moon, NASA directed the robotic Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn to swoop within 2,000 kilometers in 2007. Pictured here, from about 75,000 kilometers out, Cassini’s trajectory allowed unprecedented imaging of the hemisphere of Iapetus that is always trailing. A huge impact crater seen in the south spans a tremendous 450 kilometers and appears superposed on an older crater of similar size. The dark material is seen increasingly coating the easternmost part of Iapetus, darkening craters and highlands alike. Close inspectionindicates that the dark coating typically faces the moon’s equator and is less than a meter thick. A leading hypothesis is that the dark material is mostly dirt leftover when relatively warm but dirty ice sublimates. An initial coating of dark material may have been effectively painted on by the accretion of meteor-liberated debris from other moons.

Tomorrow’s picture: moon zoom

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